OUR PEDAGOGICAL BELIEFS


LEARNING THROUGH INQUIRY

OUR PEDAGOGICAL BELIEFS


LEARNING THROUGH INQUIRY

OUR PEDAGOGICAL BELIEFS


Starting from the Early Years, children are encouraged to be active participants in their own learning. They are introduced to ‘project-based’ learning by inquiring into subjects and topics of personal interest.

The teacher supports the inquiry process through carefully planned school trips, books and experiments to nurture the children’s interest and curiosity in a diverse range of subjects. Transdisciplinary learning involves discovering meaningful, real-life opportunities to apply mathematics and language skills to support the inquiry process and to cover subjects such as science, geography, social studies, the arts and philosophy in context.

ADVANTAGES OF THIS LEARNING APPROACH
  • Igniting children’s natural curiosity with inquiry and experimentation being at the heart of the teaching process;
  • Children are more motivated and engaged as they see the value of what they are learning and become more actively involved;
  • Encouraging time spent working as part of a group, in pairs and on one’s own provides children with the opportunity to collaborate and develop their social skills;
  • Improved self-management skills: children plan and manage their own learning as well as carrying out reflections and self and peer assessments at the end of each project (which may involve an oral presentation or temporary exhibition);
  • A transdisciplinary approach incorporates the learning of transverse skills while allowing children to practise being creative, self-reliant, caring, confident and collaborative;
  • Providing a wealth of opportunities to make learning exciting and relevant. This could be through a creative production carried out in parallel, an educational school trip or the participation of a parent whose experience and expert knowledge in a particular area may enrich the inquiry process.

Starting from the Early Years, children are encouraged to be active participants in their own learning. They are introduced to ‘project-based’ learning by inquiring into subjects and topics of personal interest.

The teacher supports the inquiry process through carefully planned school trips, books and experiments to nurture the children’s interest and curiosity in a diverse range of subjects. Transdisciplinary learning involves discovering meaningful, real-life opportunities to apply mathematics and language skills to support the inquiry process and to cover subjects such as science, geography, social studies, the arts and philosophy in context.

ADVANTAGES OF THIS LEARNING APPROACH
  • Igniting children’s natural curiosity with inquiry and experimentation being at the heart of the teaching process;
  • Children are more motivated and engaged as they see the value of what they are learning and become more actively involved;
  • Encouraging time spent working as part of a group, in pairs and on one’s own provides children with the opportunity to collaborate and develop their social skills;
  • Improved self-management skills: children plan and manage their own learning as well as carrying out reflections and self and peer assessments at the end of each project (which may involve an oral presentation or temporary exhibition);
  • A transdisciplinary approach incorporates the learning of transverse skills while allowing children to practise being creative, self-reliant, caring, confident and collaborative;
  • Providing a wealth of opportunities to make learning exciting and relevant. This could be through a creative production carried out in parallel, an educational school trip or the participation of a parent whose experience and expert knowledge in a particular area may enrich the inquiry process.